Molecular Biology

Adaption to Changes

Director: Detlef Weigel
Secretary: Hülya Wicher
Phone: +49 7071 601-1411
Fax: +49 7071 601-1412


Staff: Alphabetical List
References: Publication List


For more information, please visit our Department Website

Introduction

The long-term goal of our research is to understand both the molecular mechanisms and the evolution of adaptive traits. To this end, we are using both phenotype-first and genotype-first approaches to identify genetic variants with a potential role in local, regional or global adaptation. Such studies benefit tremendously from knowledge about the genomes of other species, as well from a historical perspective that exploits ancient DNA methods to unlock the knowledge stored in herbaria. One of our lines of research, on fitness tradeoffs, is now being supported through a grant from the ERC. You can read the application here.


Apart from scientific discoveries, training the next generation of leaders in the field is very important to us. Many former members have established successful careers, and several have won major scientific prizes and awards. There is a range of exciting opportunities to perform cutting-edge work in the department, and we are always interested in hearing from undergraduates, PhD students and postdocs who want to be part of our team.

Research Topics

Evolutionary Genetics

Phenotype-first approaches for the identification of natural variants with potential roles in adaptation continue to be an important part of our research. Arabidopsis thaliana can be found in very different habitats, and the species varies in many morphological, physiological and life history traits.

Genome Informatics

We use both phenotype-first and genotype-first approaches to understand how plants adapt to their environment. The most extensively investigated species remains Arabidopsis thaliana.

Research Topics

Evolutionary Genetics

Phenotype-first approaches for the identification of natural variants with potential roles in adaptation continue to be an important part of our research. Arabidopsis thaliana can be found in very different habitats, and the species varies in many morphological, physiological and life history traits.

Genome Informatics

We use both phenotype-first and genotype-first approaches to understand how plants adapt to their environment. The most extensively investigated species remains Arabidopsis thaliana.